In which I write things.

22 Aug

Did I mention my cat plays fetch?

  • 6
21 Aug
tony-the-intelligent-goon:

ashiibaka:

Science.

I can’t tell what my favorite part is, but it’s either
scientists wasting budget and time to see if ants count their steps
the idea to put ants on stilts
there had to be a guy who made ant stilts and put them on the ants
confused ants

The person who made the ant stilts was probably a grad student, and odds are that this ant study is only tangentially related to what they actually want to study once they finish school.
Can you imagine the conversation with other grad students at the bar?
Friend 1: I have the WORST headache from the nail polish fumes.  I can’t believe I spent nine hours today just labelling deer bones.Friend 2: My big important assignment today was going to Staples to buy as many different types of tape as I could find to test their shear strength.Friend 3: I somehow got paid for spending the day on tumblr documenting how people use gifs.This kid: I made ant stilts.Friends: …Friends: Let’s get you another drink.

tony-the-intelligent-goon:

ashiibaka:

Science.

I can’t tell what my favorite part is, but it’s either

  • scientists wasting budget and time to see if ants count their steps
  • the idea to put ants on stilts
  • there had to be a guy who made ant stilts and put them on the ants
  • confused ants

The person who made the ant stilts was probably a grad student, and odds are that this ant study is only tangentially related to what they actually want to study once they finish school.

Can you imagine the conversation with other grad students at the bar?

Friend 1: I have the WORST headache from the nail polish fumes.  I can’t believe I spent nine hours today just labelling deer bones.
Friend 2: My big important assignment today was going to Staples to buy as many different types of tape as I could find to test their shear strength.
Friend 3: I somehow got paid for spending the day on tumblr documenting how people use gifs.
This kid: I made ant stilts.
Friends: …
Friends: Let’s get you another drink.

Reblogged from revisitnormal
Originally from memewhore

(Source: memewhore)

  • 118465
20 Aug

Read More

  • 2
17 Aug

Today I made a friendly octopus that will hold your playing cards for you.

I couldn’t find any normal playing cards, so you get to admire my US trivia Go Fish cards.

  • 2
16 Aug
Contextliz011.tumblr.com

ultraericthered:

liz011:

Bryan has said that non-bender oppression was a legit thing.  If non-benders are legitimately being oppressed, that means that the people speaking out against that oppression were not, in fact, full of shit.  No matter how awesome bending may be, telling people who have no choice but to get by without it that any oppression they face is their own fault is not okay, and that is a thing Korra did.

If the resolution sucked, I’d say that counts as the book being handled poorly.  They set up a story about political unrest when an oppressed group decides that they can’t take any more and rise up against the oppressors, and the resolution was that actually the people making complaints were being manipulated by a bloodbender and we’ve got a non-bending president now so it’s okay oppression is over everyone go home.  Directing all of the negative attention to Amon allowed Korra and the rest of Republic City to discard the entire Equalist movement without engaging with any of their complaints.  That’s not okay.

And I completely agree that the officer needs to face the consequences of his actions regardless of intent.  But if that’s how you feel, I don’t understand why you were trying to make his intent a central part of this conversation in the first place.

The people speaking out against the legit oppression aren’t full of shit - the Equalists were. They were terrorists attempting to simply reverse the balance of power so that they were the oppressors and benders would be virtually extinct and claiming it all in the name of social justice. No matter what motivated them, the fact was that they were becoming every bit the bullies as those who oppressed them, and that was wrong. What Korra said was not okay. What the Equalists did was not okay. They both had huge faults, but one is the greater of two evils here.

What’s especially sad was that a resolution wouldn’t have been so hard to pull off it they hadn’t had trivial things like pro-bending antics, romantic drama, and Korra’s existential angst eat away at so much screen time. This was a story where the main conflict and the main antagonist were connected but different things. One getting taken out shouldn’t mean the other would be. 

To state that it was entirely possible for a fictional protagonist of a show to be portrayed as a well-meaning aggressor so long as the intent isn’t malicious and the actions don’t go as extreme as murder, so criticizing her for being like the eeeevil real life cops isn’t entirely fair. The officer might not be malicious, but he’s definitely a murderer. Korra, on the other hand? Not so much. 

Except that the Equalists were the only people speaking out against oppression.  The other non-benders we saw (basically Pema and Asami) were totally cool with the status quo.  They never said that actually, yes, being a non-bender is difficult and dangerous in this bender-dominated world and it would be great if they were treated more equally.  It was presented in a way where everyone who was complaining was a terrorist, which is not fair to people who are oppressed in real life.  And that presentation made it so that Korra was never given any reason to believe that any part of her reaction to it was not okay.

The original post that you were responding to was someone saying (under a read more cut where you didn’t have to see it) that aspects of the Korra universe were hitting too close to home with regard to the Mike Brown murder and were therefore bringing up a lot of unpleasant feelings that they’d rather not have to deal with when watching a cartoon.  Your reaction to someone writing about their feelings was to tell them that because you didn’t agree with their reasoning they were being unreasonable, and to try to get them to see things from the cop’s point of view.  If you think it’s an unfair comparison, fine.  But to respond to someone talking about how upset they are about a murder by telling them that you think they’re overreacting is massively insensitive.

Reblogged from ultraericthered
Originally from theletdownofkorra

(Source: theletdownofkorra)

  • 31
16 Aug
Contextliz011.tumblr.com

ultraericthered:

liz011:

ultraericthered:

ultraericthered:

theletdownofkorra:

I went to #NMOS14 last night. I’ve been upset over the murder of Mike Brown all week. I’ve been livid at the bullshit from the Ferguson police. I watched Legend of Korra as a distraction from my emotions and it instead was a grim reminder of my…

Given that a lot her recent actions and behavior show full awareness of perspectives other than her own and the potential validity of them, then an in-your-face moment of her learning that isn’t really required now. And yes, she’s stopped being needlessly aggressive. Her aggression is a natural part of her no matter what, but she’s been making progress in at least trying to keep it in check. And she didn’t even mean to throw the guy against the controls, just out of the way so that he wouldn’t attack her. It’s unclear whether her force or the ship’s own instability was to blame.

There’s never any excusing the flat-out murder of someone who was unarmed and displayed no damning evidence of being a threat to society, at all. But there could always theoretically be explanations beyond how things appear. If you don’t even consider that, then who are you to complain about a fictional character not realizing that other perspective might be valid?

I would argue that an explicit moment of her learning the error of her ways is absolutely necessary.  Book 1 was handled poorly, to the point that doing any worse a job of it would have taken some serious effort.  Any non-benders who weren’t Equalists were perfectly satisfied with the status quo, and the Equalists were a terrorist group who were presented as definite bad guys.  Korra’s response was basically “bending is awesome” and “I’ve never noticed you being oppressed so obviously you’re full of shit.”  And based on how the narrative presents it, there is no reason to believe she was wrong about that.  If there had been a scene with Pema talking about the oppression she’s faced as a non-bender, or if Korra had been without her bending long enough to learn what it’s like to be a non-bender in Republic City society, that would have gone a long way towards showing us that she was wrong and should have been more understanding.  Especially considering that the target audience for this show is children, important moral lessons like that should be made explicit.

I realize that the police officer thought his actions made sense.  As a general rule, every human being has reasons for doing the things that they do.  I’m just saying that doesn’t matter.  What matters is that he murdered an innocent, unarmed boy who had just surrendered.  By making the argument about what he thought at the time, you are claiming that his feelings are at least as important as Mike Brown’s life.  They aren’t.  And he’s already got the police department defending him and attempting to blame Mike Brown for the incident.  If you don’t support that, you should take a stand against it, because what you’re attempting to do right now ultimately serves to excuse the officer for his actions.

I personally think you exaggerate how much of a failure Book 1 was. For every failure at nuance in the conflict that the narrative made, it delivered in other aspects. For instance, bending is an awesome thing in the Avatarverse and the Equalists were full of shit - the narrative was truthful in how it presented that. However, there are some who abuse their gifts of bending to oppress weaker people - the narrative showed us that too. So the Equalists rose out of a response to that dilemma, with Noatak capitalizing off of it so that he could get followers in his quest to eliminate all bending - the narrative showed us this. So in order to put them down for good, Korra needed to put a stop to the nonbender oppression by corrupt benders and ensure that nonebender citizens got real equality with benders rather than the warped version of equality that Amon and the Equalists were pursuing. This was NOT addressed in the narrative, since what we got instead was “bad guys get beaten, everything’s okay”, even though nothing guarantees that the pre-existing conflict that led to the Equalist revolution has gone away at all, and in fact, one suspects that Amon getting outed as a bloodbender would make it worse due to all the Equalists who’d feel they got duped by a bender. So it’s less the story and more the resolution that sucked.

I’d only be “excusing” the officer if I stated I believed he doesn’t deserve to be convicted for this, which I did not and will not because he totally deserves to be convicted for this. He needs to face the consequences of his actions that cost an innocent person his life, regardless of his intent.

Bryan has said that non-bender oppression was a legit thing.  If non-benders are legitimately being oppressed, that means that the people speaking out against that oppression were not, in fact, full of shit.  No matter how awesome bending may be, telling people who have no choice but to get by without it that any oppression they face is their own fault is not okay, and that is a thing Korra did.

If the resolution sucked, I’d say that counts as the book being handled poorly.  They set up a story about political unrest when an oppressed group decides that they can’t take any more and rise up against the oppressors, and the resolution was that actually the people making complaints were being manipulated by a bloodbender and we’ve got a non-bending president now so it’s okay oppression is over everyone go home.  Directing all of the negative attention to Amon allowed Korra and the rest of Republic City to discard the entire Equalist movement without engaging with any of their complaints.  That’s not okay.

And I completely agree that the officer needs to face the consequences of his actions regardless of intent.  But if that’s how you feel, I don’t understand why you were trying to make his intent a central part of this conversation in the first place.

Reblogged from ultraericthered
Originally from theletdownofkorra

(Source: theletdownofkorra)

  • 31
16 Aug
Contextliz011.tumblr.com

ultraericthered:

ultraericthered:

theletdownofkorra:

I went to #NMOS14 last night. I’ve been upset over the murder of Mike Brown all week. I’ve been livid at the bullshit from the Ferguson police. I watched Legend of Korra as a distraction from my emotions and it instead was a grim reminder of my…

Given that a lot her recent actions and behavior show full awareness of perspectives other than her own and the potential validity of them, then an in-your-face moment of her learning that isn’t really required now. And yes, she’s stopped being needlessly aggressive. Her aggression is a natural part of her no matter what, but she’s been making progress in at least trying to keep it in check. And she didn’t even mean to throw the guy against the controls, just out of the way so that he wouldn’t attack her. It’s unclear whether her force or the ship’s own instability was to blame.

There’s never any excusing the flat-out murder of someone who was unarmed and displayed no damning evidence of being a threat to society, at all. But there could always theoretically be explanations beyond how things appear. If you don’t even consider that, then who are you to complain about a fictional character not realizing that other perspective might be valid?

I would argue that an explicit moment of her learning the error of her ways is absolutely necessary.  Book 1 was handled poorly, to the point that doing any worse a job of it would have taken some serious effort.  Any non-benders who weren’t Equalists were perfectly satisfied with the status quo, and the Equalists were a terrorist group who were presented as definite bad guys.  Korra’s response was basically “bending is awesome” and “I’ve never noticed you being oppressed so obviously you’re full of shit.”  And based on how the narrative presents it, there is no reason to believe she was wrong about that.  If there had been a scene with Pema talking about the oppression she’s faced as a non-bender, or if Korra had been without her bending long enough to learn what it’s like to be a non-bender in Republic City society, that would have gone a long way towards showing us that she was wrong and should have been more understanding.  Especially considering that the target audience for this show is children, important moral lessons like that should be made explicit.

I realize that the police officer thought his actions made sense.  As a general rule, every human being has reasons for doing the things that they do.  I’m just saying that doesn’t matter.  What matters is that he murdered an innocent, unarmed boy who had just surrendered.  By making the argument about what he thought at the time, you are claiming that his feelings are at least as important as Mike Brown’s life.  They aren’t.  And he’s already got the police department defending him and attempting to blame Mike Brown for the incident.  If you don’t support that, you should take a stand against it, because what you’re attempting to do right now ultimately serves to excuse the officer for his actions.

Reblogged from ultraericthered
Originally from theletdownofkorra

(Source: theletdownofkorra)

  • 31
16 Aug

Context

ultraericthered:

theletdownofkorra:

I went to #NMOS14 last night. I’ve been upset over the murder of Mike Brown all week. I’ve been livid at the bullshit from the Ferguson police. I watched Legend of Korra as a distraction from my emotions and it instead was a grim reminder of my reality.

Read More

Except, y’know, Korra stopped acting that needlessly aggressive, violent, pushy, and irrational by the end of Book 2, and has since then been FAR less “ignorant and unchecked” throughout all of Book 3? And really, I’d think it’d be Lin who’s the triggering character for this matter, not Korra.

Plus, there are two sides to every story. Do we have proof that the cop was the blindly aggressive one here? Not that it in any way excuses the cop for shooting James Brown to death when he was clearly unarmed, but in his mind and his perspective, he might have felt he was upholding his duty.

Except that we haven’t actually seen Korra develop beyond that.  She has never had a moment of realizing that perspectives other than hers might be valid, that other people might have things they have every right to be angry about that she hasn’t faced.  And has she really stopped being needlessly aggressive, or has the show presented fewer instances where the audience might read it as needless?  As I recall it was just last week that she broke an airship by throwing someone against the controls while trying to take over.

Your “two sides to every story” line is absolute bullshit (and given that you didn’t even get Mike Brown’s name correct, I doubt you’ve even been following the story).  Here is an eyewitness account of what happened.  The first shot was fired at point blank range.  The second shot was fired while Mike Brown was running away.  The next seven were fired when he had stopped running, put his hands in the air, and announced that he was unarmed.  That’s seven shots fired at someone who had just SURRENDERED.  There is no fucking way that you can argue that at that point he was performing his duty and keeping the streets safe.  (Also, saying that he might have thought he was doing the right thing sounds a hell of a lot like making excuses for him, despite your claims to the contrary.)

Reblogged from ultraericthered
Originally from theletdownofkorra

(Source: theletdownofkorra)

  • 31
15 Aug

stfu-moffat:

 said to :

But Peter Capaldi simply looks older. His character didn’t get any older. I understand him being uncomfortable with it, but going from the body of a 31 year old to a 56 year old wouldn’t be that much of a leap for a 1500+ year old Time Lord. Therefor it may not be “nice” to look at or make actors feel uncomfortable, but if it was really wrong, they should’ve started a long time ago.

I think that’s a fair point about his age (although it makes Ten and Eleven seem much creepier), but I think it’s hard not to be influenced by the ages of the actors, especially when the actors who play the companions are so young (and conventionally attractive). Matt Smith isn’t much older than either Karen Gillan or Jenna Louise Coleman, so it looks less creepy. I don’t know really, I think the age of the actors is important, because of how the relationships appear (reinforcing sexist attitudes to relationships), but I know that in the show’s canon th actor’s age has nothing to do with the Doctor’s age.

But it isn’t really fair to say that they should have done something earlier, because Doctor Who has cast a lot of unknowns (especially compared with the popularity of the show), so neither Karen Gillan nor Jenna Louise Coleman would have been able to put a stop to it, whereas Peter Capaldi is better known and probably had more of a say.

- C

Capaldi’s Doctor actually is starting a lot older than Matt Smith’s Doctor.  RTD basically did 1 season=1 Doctor year, so that Nine was 903 when he met Rose and Ten was about 907 or 908 when he regenerated into Eleven.  Moffat has been rapidly aging the Doctor by throwing in lines that suggest we’ve missed a few centuries of his life, so that Twelve is starting at about 2000 years old.  I recognize that in either case it’s a multi-century age gap, but the age gap has more than doubled in size and that scale ought to count for something.

Also, some fans (including myself) have expressed discomfort with implied romantic or sexual tension between Eleven and Clara because of the blatant power imbalance.  In addition to the fact that he’s older and has seen more of the universe and has cooler toys, he tends to make decisions for her without consulting her (which Ten almost never did to Rose, and any time he did there was some kind of negative consequence).  I would say that it’s primarily that imbalance that makes the relationship problematic, and it’s probably much easier to just refuse to flirt with her than to insist that every script treat her like an equal, because people find ways to rationalize unequal treatment as a narrative necessity.

Reblogged from stfu-moffat
Originally from stfu-moffat

  • 31
Asker's Avatar14 Aug

Anonymous asked:

You're asexual? What does that mean?

Oh look, someone made a fact sheet.

<< Newer - 1 of 65 - Older >>

About

In which I write things.I'm a 24 year old math teacher, feminist, and nerd. My blog will involve all of these things, and probably a smattering of random nonsense.